World Poetry Celebrates Poet and Artist Synn Kune Loh!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ariadne’s Notes: The World Poetry Café Radio Show on CFRO, 100.5 FM  August 16,  at 1:10 PM ,PST welcomed our feature poet Synn Kune Loh in an amazing interview on his life spirituality, art and living with Parkinson’s disease. He read for his two books A Journey to Camatkara, and The Ping Pong Diaries as well about his new one in the making. Lincoln Poetry Club member, Alex Austin  was the featured e-poet with his poem Ghost Houses in Karuizawa, Japan.

Also a tribute to the internationally know Aretha Franklin who recently past away living behind an amazing legacy of songs and her work in Civil Rights. A brand new story by Sharon Rowe called Sharon’s Birthday Celebration was read by Victor Swartzman , technician and author. Co hosted by Ariadne Sawyer and Dr. Diego Bastianutti.

LISTEN TO THE SHOW HERE!

 

 

 

 

Biography.
Synn Kune Loh is a visual artist, a painter, a poet ad a song writer.
He is the author of a book of poetry titled “A Journey to Camatkara,”
and a CD, “Return to the Boundless Light.” He was born in China and grew up in Hong Kong.
He received a BA in psychology from the University of Bridgeport in Connecticutt, U.S.A.
While studying for his MA in Cultural Psychology at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario,
he took a trip to Paris and discovered his passion to make art. He went to the 

Poem and biography

Speaking is just making noise.
Talking is too much about facts.

Conversation is connection.

Real conversation is silence.,
a heart to heart communication.

Contemplation is mind expansion,
an underrated pleasure.
beyond the physical dimension.

Meditation is soul revelation.

Surviving samsara is our journey.
Remembering nirvana is our destination.

Poetry is a new leaf
emerging from the old self.

Let talk to each other then,
with poetry,
the real conversation.

Synn Kune Loh (C) All rights reserved

 

 

World Poetry Celebrates the Lincoln Poetry Club!

Ariadne’s Notes:  World Poetry Celebrates our partner the Lincoln Poetry Club with the first two award winning  poets .  World Poetry was honoured to welcome them and feature their first two poets whose poems were read on the World Poetry Café Radio Show.

A message from the coordinator  Alan Lowe :

“The Poets Club of Lincoln holds an Open Mic the second Sunday of each month, January through November. The program begins with a 30-40 minute presentation by a guest poet followed by an intermission with refreshments. After the break, all poets in attendance may read up to three poems, depending on the number of poets who wish to read. Poets come from Lincoln and surrounding areas. Alan Lowe has been the Coordinator of the Voices of Lincoln Poetry Contest, presented by the club, for ten years. He is responsible for setting up the contest to begin in April— National Poetry Month—publicizing it and the special event held in October at which winning poets read their poems, coordinating and serving as host/moderator of the event, and designing, putting together, and publishing the chapbook of winning poetry.”

First award winning poem on the show. 

Love Is Where You Find It by Jeanie Robertson:

Jeanie Robertson has written poetry since she was in grammar school. She is one of five generations of rhyming poets. They have self-published two books and are doing the final editing on the third book. Jeanie has been published in a local monthly paper many times in the last 15 years. She writes simple poetry about everyday life that is easily identifiable. Writing is her favorite hobby.

LOVE IS WHERE YOU FIND IT
She was a chihuahua mix
A terrier mix was he
They had lived together
With a growing family.

Until one day a moving van
Took everything away.
They were not part of the plan
So they were left to stray.

Life was hard and they were sad
But true love kept them strong
They would be “forever friends”
Like lyrics in a song.

A couple one day walking
Took home the little strays
And life forever after
Would be their favorite days.

Their people must live somewhere
Near this family neighborhood
And someone may be frantic
If these pets are gone for good.

It seemed no one was looking
For this little girl and guy
And the couple who were walking
Couldn’t help but wonder why.

The pups continued following
Them right to their front door,
Their little tails wagging,
As tho they’d been here before.

These caring people took them in
Perhaps they’d find a clue
To whom the friendly pups belonged
And what next they should do.

The dogs did not have collars
No ID tags where they live
The couple knew these little ones
Had so much love to give.

These kind people, were Beth and Bud,
Intent to find the home
Of precious little furry friends
Left on the streets to roam.

Beth checked with the authorities
For ID chips within
But seems they never had them
Buried deep beneath their skin.

Then Beth and Bud put flyers
All around the neighborhood
But nobody responded…
Now the dogs were theirs for good!

They named them Chance and Sadie
Living there, but the best part?
The dogs now have A SECOND CHANCE
And family with a heart.

by Jeanie Robertson, Award winning poem, Lincoln Club. (C) All rights reserved.

 

 

Second award winning  poet with her poem:

Kathleen Ward was born in Lockport, NY, but moved to California at the age of 12. She graduated from the California State University at Sacramento with a degree in English, and taught junior high school in Los Banos, CA, for twenty-five years. She is a member of the Poets Club of Lincoln, CA and has won several awards for her poetry. She is now retired and living in Lincoln, CA, where she spends her time writing poetry and fiction when she is not busy traveling or playing with her grandchildren.

If I Had A Second Chance
I would have given a dollar
Or a hamburger
To the homeless woman
Huddled by the off-ramp,
Her eyes and face as droopy
As her worn-out cardboard sign.
I would have held doors open
For people even when
They did not need the help
And I would remember to
Thank those who took the time
To open doors for me.
I would have stopped to answer
My three-year-old’s question,
Even though it was
The twentieth time she’d asked one
In the past ten minutes
And I’d answered them all before.
I would have tape-recorded
My grandma’s stories
The ones I loved when growing up,
So that my children could hear
Them in Grandma’s words, and bask
In the sweet tones of her voice.
I would have spent more time
Walking on the beach at sunrise
Hiking dark trails through the woods
Picking wildflowers by the roadside
Dancing with butterflies
Laughing with old friends.
If I had a second chance. 

by Kathleen Ward, Lincoln, CA (C) All rights reserved by the author.

World Poetry Celebrates Allegra Levy’s New CD!

Ariadne’s Notes: The World Poetry Café Radio Show, August 9, CFRO 100.5 FM welcomed the great musician and singer, Allegra Levy’ at 1:30 PM, PST.  The CD is lovely, with the focus being on the mysterious moon, romantic and enticing.  She is rising young New York-based singer-songwriter with a  new album Looking at the Moon by SteepleChase Records. https://www.allegralevy.com/ 

WP Team: Ariadne Sawyer, MA, host and producer, Victor Swartzman, sound engineer, Sharon Rowe, special volunteer. Music by Andy Vine and Allegra Levy. Thanks to Braithwaite and Katz publicists.

LISTEN TO THE SHOW HERE!

 

Rising young New York-based singer-songwriter Allegra Levy’s new album Looking at the Moon is out TODAY (June 15, 2018) via SteepleChase Records. On her third release Levy – known as a “double-barreled talent” (JazzTimes) for both her vocalism and song-writing – turns to songs written by others, with a unifying theme: the moon.

Looking at the Moon features 13 much-loved odes to the shimmering orb, from “Blue Moon” and “Paper Moon” to the inimitable “No Moon at All.” Her collaborators on the new record are bassist Tim Norton and her longtime accompanist Carmen Staaf, plus rising guitarist Alex Goodman.

Vocalist Allegra Levy brings fresh interpretations to songs with a lunar theme on her third album Looking at the Moon

“Levy’s music is sophisticated, worldly and swinging, with a wide range of tonal colors and moods not unlike Portland’s Pink Martini. Levy’s voice is one we should expect to hear from for a long time.”— Mike Hamad, Hartford Courant

“Her lyrics are uncommonly smart, full of striking imagery and a pervasive angst. As all first-rate jazz vocalists do, she sings in character, word by word, line by line.” — Alan Young, New York Music Daily

The usual way to start a jazz vocal career is to stick with standards, trilling and scatting in the well-traveled tracks of great singers who have come before. Rising young New York-based singer-songwriter Allegra Levy eschewed that approach on her acclaimed first two albums, which consisted almost entirely of original compositions. Now, with her third release, she turns to songs written by others, with a unifying theme: the moon.

Looking at the Moon, due June 15, 2018 on SteepleChase Records, features 13 much-loved odes to the shimmering orb, from “Blue Moon” and “Paper Moon” to the inimitable “No Moon at All.”

With her new album Looking at the Moon, Levy abandons her autobiographical “city” theme, setting her sights out of this world, but also, in another respect, on more familiar ground. “I was a little bit nervous about doing a record that was not original works because I’m still trying to develop my voice as a composer,” the 28-year-old Levy admits. “But I’ve always wanted to do this moon-themed thing. For some reason, people seem to write really good tunes when it comes to the elusive moon.”

Levy concedes that there is nothing all that novel when it comes to singing about the moon. Frank Sinatra didn’t just fly us to the moon, for example; he recorded an entire album about it. Yet the lunar sphere has long fascinated Levy. She was moonstruck from an early age. “The first thing that my mom used to sing to me when I was a young child was ‘Moonshadow,’” she recalls. Cat Stevens’ 1970 pop hit proved to be more than a hip lullaby for her. It was love at first sound.

The first song Levy ever performed publicly in her native Connecticut, as a teenager, was “How High the Moon,” one of Ella Fitzgerald’s signature tunes. Later, when required to create a big-band chart for her senior thesis at New England Conservatory, she chose Henry Mancini’s “Moon River.” She closed most of her gigs with that song for years and has adapted it for the opening track. “There was no real reason for any of these moon connections,” she says. “They just seemed to appear in every phase of my life.”

Source : Braithwaite and Katz , https://www.allegralevy.com/