Tag Archives: Author Sharon Rowe

World Poetry Celebrates Jacqueline Maire & Lello Molinari!

 

 

 

Ariadne’s Notes:

On March 29th. 1-2 PM PST, the World Poetry Café Radio Show, CFRO 100.5 FM PST  welcomed features:

Jacqueline Maire, World Poetry Lifetime Achievement Winner  and author with her poems in English and French.

Co-host Dr. Diego Bastianutti took the hosting lead for  Bassist/bandleader Lello Molinari’s new album  Italian Job, Lello and Diego discussed  the importance of roots with music selections. A fascinating show in English, French, Italian and Spanish. Lello’s section below. 

E-poem: By the talented youth Wonder Poet Kezang Dawa from the lovely country of Bhutan.

 E-poem by Malik Ahmed originally from Bangladesh.

Thanks to our World Poetry Team of Ariadne Sawyer, MA, producer , co-host Diego Bastianutti and special Volunteer Sharon Rowe.

Music by Laura Kelsey with her new CD Dispell, . http://dispellband.bandcamp.com to be launched on the World Poetry Café radio Show, April 5th, 1-2 pm.

LISTEN HERE FOR The RADIO SHOW!

 

 

 

 

 Feature Bassist/Bandleader Lello Molinari Returns to his Italian Roots, Reimagines Classic Repertoire in Stunning Modern Jazz Settings

Lello’s Italian Job, Volume 2 features Italian and Italian-American musicians transforming folk and popular songs and classical arias from throughout Italy’s rich musical history

“Lello’s Italian Job, Volume 1 is a dynamic showcase for [Molinari’s] instrumental skills… covering an all-star roster of Italian musical icons with passion, respect and imagination.”

– Stacey Zering, No Depression

“Molinari’s music: in your face, a little raw, fiercely alive.” – Thomas Conrad, DownBeat

It’s often been said that “you can’t go home again” – but with his Italian Job project, Lello Molinari proves that old cliché wrong. The acclaimed bassist has not only returned to his Italian roots, but brought with him three decades of experience as a bandleader, an educator, and a virtuosic bassist with his fingers on the pulse of modern jazz. Now he views the unparalleled musical traditions of his homeland through the lens of a lifetime’s worth of accumulated musical knowledge, creating something that’s both Old World and New, deeply personal while reflecting a profound tradition.

Molinari left his native Naples, Italy in 1986 to study jazz at Boston’s Berklee College of Music. In the intervening years he’s gone on to become a revered educator at that same institution, perform as an in-demand bassist on both the jazz and classical music scenes in Boston, tour the U.S. and Europe with his own Quintet, and venture to the leading edges of jazz in partnership with saxophone great George Garzone.

In recent years, however, Molinari began to glance back over his shoulder at the wealth of musical riches to be found in the land of his birth. That adventure began as part of his 2000 album Multiple Personalities, which peppered three Italian tunes into an album that also veered from forward-leaning jazz to a Monk classic, and featured Garzone, guitarist Mick Goodrick, pianist Frank Carlberg and renowned Italian vocalist Chiara Civello. On the 2016 release Lello’s Italian Job, Volume 1, he explored material from across the wide spectrum of Italian song – traditional folk music, classical arias, popular songs – and radically transformed them through his own singular jazz voice. Now, with Lello’s Italian Job, Volume 2, he offers a second collection that marries timeless melodies to contemporary sounds.  The CD will be released on Friday, March 9, 2018 via Fata Morgana Music.

“I had a desire to reconnect with my roots,” Molinari says. “But I also wanted to incorporate these new things that I’ve learned over the years here in the States to old material and give it a fresh look and a fresh take.”

As on the first volume, Molinari leads a quartet of stellar artists who share his Italian heritage – and are all members of the Berklee faculty. Drummer Marcello Pellitteri is a fellow immigrant, hailing originally from Sicily, while saxophonist Dino Govoni and guitarist Sal DiFusco are both Italian-American. Their repertoire for Volume 2 varies from a Respighi tone poem to popular Neapolitan songs that have been sung for generations, to original music penned for the project.

With centuries of musical history to delve into, Molinari found that the hardest part of the project has been whittling down his list to just enough repertoire to fill (so far) two volumes. “Rather than picking which songs to do, I really had to think about which ones not to do,” he says. “If you think about Italian music, it’s like saying

‘Jazz’ – there’s so much and it’s so diverse that it’s impossible to put it into one place. Because I play with a number of orchestras, I’ve reconnected recently with classical music and opera. Then there are certain pieces of music that I just adore and that I wanted to do with my group in my way. Others were songs that I grew up with, folk songs that I’ve known since I was a kid. So it was a natural process.”

The insistent tap of Pellitteri’s percussion opens “’O Sarracino,” a popular song by legendary Neapolitan performer Renato Carosone, given a jazz-funk feel by Govoni’s keening soprano, Molinari’s slinky electric bass line, and DiFusco’s strummed groove. “Jazz Tarantella” takes the melody that is the bane of every Italian’s existence – you know the one, it accompanies every Italian stereotype and cartoon that’s ever appeared on screen – and reimagines it as an alluring straightahead jazz tune in the vein of Miles Davis’ “Dear Old Stockholm.” DiFusco’s original “Sulla Strada di Damasco” follows, inspired by the story of the conversion of Saint Paul and incorporating a vaguely Middle Eastern feel.

“Intermezzo Sinfonico,” from Pietro Mascagni’s operatic masterpiece “Cavalleria Rusticana,” is jolted into the present via Govoni’s EWI (Electronic Wind Instrument) and Lello’s harmonies on Electric basses, while Pino Daniele’s “’na Tazzulella ‘e Café” makes the unlikely journey from Napoli espresso bar to Bourbon Street coffeehouse in Molinari’s New Orleans-influenced arrangement. Ottorino Respighi’s four-movement tone poem “Pini di Roma” becomes a lush, impressionistic ballad, followed by Luigi Canoro’s famous mazurka “Tra Veglia e Sonno,” which opens familiarly with a mandolin and percussion intro before Govoni’s tenor shifts it firmly into the jazz realm.

“Lidio Napoletano” shows off the improvisational empathy of the trio, built on a short melody in the Lydian mode and created in homage to the treasured Boston band The Fringe, mainstays on the local scene for more than four decades. “Anema e Core,” which has been sung in different languages by everyone from Perry Como to Andrea Boccelli, is a famous Neapolitan song written by Salve D’Esposito in 1950, rendered as a moving duet for bass and guitar. Another song that’s traveled the globe, the famous “Torna a Surriento” has been recorded by everyone from Luciano Pavarotti to Dean Martin to Elvis Presley (as “Surrender”), its heartbreaking melody here pairing Govoni’s EWI with cello played by Meena Murthy. The gorgeous melody of “Tu ‘si ‘na Cosa Grande” is set to a slow, swaying beguine, while Molinari and Pellitteri close the session with an improvised duet, evocatively titled “Neapolitan Snake.”

“I guess as I get more mature,” Molinari concludes, “I don’t need to play ‘punk jazz’ anymore or do music that’s so difficult to listen to. I can enjoy a simple structure, a simple melody – Lello’s Italian Job lets me do both, reinterpreting this old material from a new, contemporary jazz point of view.”

Lello Molinari: Born and raised in Naples, Italy, bassist, bandleader and educator Lello Molinari studied contrabass at the Scuola Civica in Sesto San Giovanni. In 1985 he joined the Italian Vocal Ensemble, performing on radio and television as well as at Italy’s leading jazz festivals. The following year he moved to Boston to study at Berklee College of Music, earning his Bachelors Degree there and his Masters from the New England Conservatory. He’s since joined the Berklee faculty, where he leads an ensemble dedicated to the music of his mentor, Dave Holland, and a new ensemble drawing on Italian repertoire. In the early ‘90s Molinari toured the US and Canada with the acclaimed Either/Orchestra and began a longstanding collaboration with sax great George Garzone. Since 1992 he’s been the principal bassist for the Melrose Symphony Orchestra, with whom he’s recorded several albums. He’s also a member of the Cape Ann Symphony, Hillyer Festival Orchestra, and Salem Philharmonic. Molinari has played with such jazz legends as Kenny Wheeler, George Garzone, Mike Melillo, Jerry Bergonzi and Victor Lewis, leads his own Quintet and co-leads the trio 3Play. Lello’s Italian Job, Volume 2 is his 5th release as a leader.

Source :  Braitwaite and Katz with thanks. * Sorry to be so late, was doing a special project.

 

World Poetry Celebrates the Wonderful Lozan Yamolky!

 

 

Ariadne’s Notes:  The World Poetry Cafe Radio Show  on March 22, 1-2 PM, PST , CFRO 100.5 FM, was honoured to welcome one of the bright lights of the world, the poet and short story writer, Lozan Yamolky. She had exciting news to share with the radio audience from around the world. Also featured e-poets: 

Mahmood Jan from Afghanistan, a peace poet who send a poem-song, Peace Space that I am editing and may be composed into music by a band in Ghana. The first edited section was also read in Arabic by Lozan who said that the poem was so beautiful, that she had to translate it in Arabic. 

In addition , another e-poet was the well known Indian Poet, Mantgega Damodara Chary . If I have permission, I may be sharing the e-poets poems on site. As usual great thanks to The World Poetry Team, Ariadne Sawyer, MA , host and producer, Victor Swartzman , our great sound tech and Sharon Rowe , special volunteer.  Also, to guest host Diego Bastianutti  who comes in once per month. Also, breaking news! The World Poetry Cafe is celebrating it’s 20th year on being on the air! If you like our show and want to contribute to our fundraising to keep on the air go to: www.coopradio.org, go to members /donate and put in the name of the World Poetry Cafe. We are all volunteers and have to come up with 1,000 per year to keep on the air. Then let me know at ariadnes@uniserve.com and we will announce your donations or membership on the show and give you two interviews per year. We now have 104 countries that listen to our show. We work to bring the world together in respect, empowerment and peace.

 

 Listen TO THE SHOW HERE!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lozan Yamolky was born and raised in Baghdad, Iraq in 1972. She is the fifth of eleven children, three boys, and seven girls. She recently traced and tested her DNA and found out she is of Armenian descent from her mother’s side and Kurdish from her father’s side.

While living in Western Iraq and in Baghdad, Lozan began writing in her early teens and mostly short sentences not knowing that such deeply felt words and short lines were called poetry until her uncle Serwan Yamolky inspired and encouraged her to not only keep writing but to stop destroying what she has written because she feared others would make fun of her writing about her personal feelings.

Her family left their homeland and managed to arrive in the capital of Turkey to seek asylum in 1994. She immigrated to Canada with her family in 1995. She has lived, studied, volunteered and worked in the Greater Vancouver area ever since. She is the mother of two boys from her previous marriage and happily married a second time and continues living in Vancouver. She works as a freelance interpreter and volunteers helping refugees and newcomers arriving in Canada.

Lozan believes peace is possible when we look beyond skin color, gender, place of origin, religious beliefs and political views. We can make peace when we allow ourselves to change our minds to gain knowledge as new information and new ideas come along. We need the courage to speak up, volunteer, donate and stand up in support of those whose rights have been taken away from them; because tomorrow we may be the ones marginalized and pointed at for being different and we may be persecuted with nobody to help us.

Lozan believes poetry heals and connects us. Poetry expresses when face-to-face conversations can’t convey our point of view sufficiently. Poetry brings a calm serenity to self that ultimately will bring peace to the world.

World Poetry Celebrates the Jazz Great Leslie Pintchik!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ariadne’s Notes: World Poetry Cafe Radio Show, CFRO 100.5 FM , welcomed the talented composer and musician Leslie Pintchik calling in at 1:30 pm PST with the new CD: YOU EAT MY FOOD, YOU DRINK MY WINE, YOU STEAL MY GIRL! Leslie kindly gave advice and wisdom to a young adult in England worried about her career.  One of my favorite parts of the show was when she was describing having composed a song and was looking for a title, when she heard a loud voice behind her in New York, shouting: “YOU EAT MY FOOD, YOU DRINK MY WINE, YOU STEAL MY GIRL!” She had the name of her song which became the title of the CD. A fascinating interview with the interesting songs and the exciting guest.

Do not miss this show, below.

LISTEN TO THE SHOW HERE!

 

 

 

 

 

 

PIANIST/COMPOSER LESLIE  RELEASES SIXTH CD

YOU EAT MY FOOD, YOU DRINK MY WINE, YOU STEAL MY GIRL!

WITH STELLAR BAND, FEBRUARY 23, 2018

* Featuring Steve Wilson, Ron Horton, Shoko Nagai, Scott Hardy, Michael Sarin, and Satoshi Takeishi *

 “A composer of emotional depth and effortless lyricism.” – DownBeat

“Getting lost in this music is simply a joy.” – AllAboutJazz

“A crafty, lyrically minded improviser and a compelling composer…” – The New Yorker

“…achingly beautiful…a level of intimacy that is rare today in jazz.” – JazzWax.com

Pianist and composer Leslie Pintchik found the title for her new album in one of those “only in New York” moments. While crossing Canal Street at West Broadway in the SoHo section of Manhattan, she heard a voice behind her yell, “You eat my food, you drink my wine, you steal my girl!” As it happened, she’d just completed writing a new composition, and at that very moment she knew she’d found its title. It was a perfect fit for the sharp-elbows vibe of the piece, with its samba-funk groove, understated humor and fender-bender of an ending. So with one gruff shout, serendipity handed her a bold, spunky title, for a bold, spunky tune.

With its implied but elusive narrative and personality to spare, the outburst also turned out to be a perfect title for Pintchik’s new recording, which features six of her original tunes and two standards. As on her five previous albums, Pintchik has penned a collection of songs overflowing with warmth, humor, tenderness, depth and smarts – without forsaking her razor-sharp edge. Pintchik is unique in combining a brisk energy and drive with a gift for accessible, infectious melodies – like that overheard accusation, her music strikes a unique balance between the sharp-edged and the charming. You Eat My Food, You Drink My Wine, You Steal My Girl! will be released February 23, 2018 via Pintch Hard Records. In his liner notes for the CD, Allen Morrison writes: “As a composer, [Pintchik is] like a novelist, unspooling each song like a good story with twists and turns, and with a story-teller’s patience and sense of form. And, like a good novel, her songs appeal to both the head and the heart; they are subtle, sometimes wry, sometimes somber. I think they’re not-so-buried treasures, waiting to be discovered by other jazz artists.” In addition, the wide range of grooves (samba-funk with a touch of partido alto, swing, bolero, traditional samba, straight-eighths, and ballads-all played with exceptional skill and pizzazz by Leslie and her top-notch band members) is a great added pleasure.

For this outing, Pintchik returns once again with the musicians with whom she has played and recorded for many years: Steve Wilson on alto sax, Ron Horton on trumpet and flugelhorn, Scott Hardy on bass and guitar, drummer Michael Sarin, and percussionist Satoshi Takeishi. On accordion, Shoko Nagai is the newcomer, and a wonderfully intriguing addition to the mix. Recalling the recording session, Pintchik said “I had the time of my life playing with these extraordinary musicians and people, all gems and superb players.”

“You Eat My Food, You Drink My Wine, You Steal My Girl!” is not the only mouthful of a title on the album. It’s topped by “Your call will be answered by our next available representative, in the order in which it was received. Please stay on the line; your call is important to us,” which should instantly raise the blood pressure of anyone who’s ever wasted hours of their life on hold to fix – or at least attempt to – a problem that’s already wasted too much time. Fueled by that all-too-common experience, the tune swings hard with a fervor born of equal parts frustration and an antic comic spirit. Special kudos to the rhythm section for its drive amidst the unexpected stops and starts.

From the playful to the poignant: Pintchik’s ballad “Mortal” was written, she says, “to express a sense of life’s fragility, beauty, and especially shortness.” A highlight of the set, “Mortal” showcases a fearless use of space and silence, and gorgeous heart-on-the-sleeve solos from Pintchik, Wilson, Horton and Hardy. (Of particular note is Horton’s flugelhorn solo, which is both beautiful and wrenching.) On the opposite end of the emotional spectrum, “Happy Dog,” as its name suggests, is a cheerful tune. Shoko Nagai plays the melody in unison with Pintchik, and the samba-based rhythm provides a simpatico backdrop for the wonderfully frisky solos of Pintchik, Hardy and Takeishi. Like Pintchik’s tunes, Edward Hopper’s paintings are renowned for suggesting stories not quite told in full within the confines of their canvases. A tune with a straight eighths time feel that features Shoko Nagai on accordion, “Hopperesque” was inspired by the iconic artist’s work, especially those paintings that depict people in the kind of threshold moments that provoke the viewer to wonder what happened before, and what might come after, the scene we’re presented with. “I’ve tried,” Pintchik says, “to capture that feeling of mystery.” One of the earliest tunes written for the album, “A Simpler Time” was inspired by the composer’s trip to the Hancock Shaker Village in Massachusetts, where she was touched by the rare adult cradles that she saw, used to soothe the elderly and infirm. Pintchik characterizes the piece as “an adult lullaby.” In his liner notes, Morrison writes, “There’s an emotional maturity to it that seems to acknowledge that life itself is not simple, that we are often overwhelmed with hard choices and mixed emotions, and we have a universal need for kindness. As with so many of Leslie’s songs, the melody is memorable, but not simple.” Approaching the album’s standards with the same unique perspective and wry insight that she brings to her own tunes, Pintchik plays the jazz and pop standard “I’m Glad There Is You” as a bolero, which affords the melody of this love song a lot of breathing room. Morrison writes, “It’s one of the most tender readings of this great song (by Jimmy Dorsey and Paul Madeira) that I’ve ever heard.” The Jerome Kern/Otto Harbach chestnut “Smoke Gets In Your Eyes” is played as a samba, with an added catchy rhythmic hook that bookends the melody. This version features a wonderfully relaxed rhythm section that, in the ending tag, builds up a strong head of caffeinated Brazilian steam, before the rhythmic hook returns, and it’s over and out. Leslie Pintchik Short Bio Before embarking on a career in jazz, Leslie Pintchik was a teaching assistant in English literature at Columbia University, where she also received her Master of Philosophy degree in seventeenth-century English literature. She first surfaced on the Manhattan scene in a trio with legendary bassist Red Mitchell at Bradley’s, and in the ensuing years Pintchik formed her own trio which performs regularly at New York City jazz venues. Pintchik’s debut CD So Glad To Be Here was released in June 2004, followed by Quartets in 2007. About So Glad To Be Here, Ken Micallef wrote in DownBeat “Pintchik’s music is fresh, full of light and instantly invigorating (4 stars).” In the fall of 2010, she released her third CD We’re Here To Listen, as well as a DVD Leslie Pintchik Quartet Live In Concert.  Jim Wilke, creator of the nationally syndicated “Jazz After Hours” radio show included We’re Here To Listen on his “Best CDs of 2010” list, and the jazz journalist and scholar W. Royal Stokes included both projects in his “Best of 2010” list. Pintchik’s fourth CD In The Nature Of Things was released on March, 2014. Steve Futterman, in The New Yorker magazine, called it “…one of the more captivating recordings to come out so far this year…”, and Gary Walker of WBGO jazz radio called it “…a gorgeous display of the trio.” In his review of Pintchik’s fifth CD True North-released in March, 2016-Dan Bilawsky in AllAboutJazz.com wrote “Leslie Pintchik’s music has a magical draw to itŠ Getting lost in this music is simply a joy. If 2016 has a more pleasurable listen to offer than True North, this writer hasn’t heard it yet. (4 1/2 stars)”

In addition to composing the music for her band, Leslie has also written the liner notes for some notable recent jazz CDs, including Duologue by saxophonist Steve Wilson and drummer Lewis Nash (on the MCG label), and Daybreak by pianist Bruce Barth (on the Savant label).

www.lesliepintchik.com

www.pintchhard.com

Source: Braithwaite and Katz.