Tag Archives: Braitwaite and Katz

World Poetry Celebrates Poet Herb Bryce From Canada!

 

 

 

 

 

Hope by Neamat Haidari , with permission.

Ariadne’s Notes: On June, 14, 1-2 PM, PST, the World Poetry Café Radio Show welcomed poet and writer Herb Bryce  (Due to technical difficulties, he will be back on August 2 )and the  beautifully talented  musician and composer Sara Serpa with her new CD  Close Up. Brought to us by our great partners Braitwaite and Katz.

Also on the show was a beautiful poem by Kagan Goh for his father read by Ariadne Sawyer and a Father’s Day poem from Elaine Woo read by our great tech Victor Schwartzman. Another Big Bessie story from  Special Volunteer Sharon Rowe was  also read by Victor. 

 

TO HEAR THE RADIO SHOW, CLICK HERE

 

 

 

 

W. Bryce is a former journalist and newspaper editor, book editor and teacher. He has been a traveler (kidnapped and robbed), and has worked as a courier and a farm hand. His writings have appeared in anthologies in the United States, in British Columbia, Canada, in the “Fifty-five Plus” annual directory, “Today’s Senior Magazine,” and “Bryce’s Blog for Seniors.” His work is also in several local anthologies. Previous features, and comic strips, have appeared in “The Daily Mirror Book for Boys,” and “…for Girls,” in London, England, where he worked as a book editor. He also plied his journalistic skills with a daily newspaper in Worthing, England. In Canada, he worked at various newspapers in his home province of Saskatchewan, and  at The Globe and Mail. Upon his return from his travels in Spain, Portugal, North Africa, the Middle East, etc., he signed on with The Hamilton Spectator. He has a degree in English and Journalism from Western University in London, Ontario, Canada, as well as teacher’s certification from the University of Alberta. Mr. Bryce, author of “Ann – A Tribute,” and “Chasing a Butterfly – A journey of love and loss to acceptance,” a book of poetry arising from his decade as care giver to his Alzheimer’s wife, writes from his home in Maple Ridge, British Columbia, Canada.

LUCKY ONE

Oh, I have been the lucky one

To have lived and learned with her,

For always it was she,

The happy, doing one,

The giving, caring soul.

Our life has been,

Since those giddy, happy times,

A story of adventure,

One of give and take

And always and for ‘ever,’

Love for each and other’s sake.

How lucky to have met her,

How marvelous she cared.

Forever will I wonder

Why it was she dared

To have belief in me.

But whatever was the mystery,

Always I will cherish

The faith that both we shared

Through our lifelong span together—

So happy we were paired.

And I am not complaining,

Indeed I’m giving thanks,

For what I’ve gained from what she gave

Would enrich, I think, all of Britain’s banks.

And now when she is fading,

And I reflect upon our past,

I see the longer shadow,

The one that she has cast.

Herb W. Bryce (C) All rights reserved by the author.

 

 

World Poetry Celebrates The Talented Musician Sera Serpa!

 

 

The World Poetry Café  on June  14,  (CFRO 100.5 FM )at 1:30 PM PST, celebrated the  beautifully talented  musician and composer Sara Serpa with her new CD  Close Up. Brought to us by our great partners Braitwaite and Katz. I absolutely loved her new CD which combines her lovely voice with cello and tenor sax.

Also on the show was a beautiful poem by Kagan Goh for his father read by Ariadne Sawyer and a Father’s Day poem from Elaine Woo read by our great tech Victor Schwartzman. Another Big Bessie story from  Special Volunteer Sharon Rowe was  also read by Victor. 

Due to technical difficulties  at 1:10 PM, Herb Bryce will be re-scheduled to August 2nd.

TO LISTEN TO THE SHOW! 

 

 

 

 

 

 Notes  by Sara Serpa on her new CD : “Close Up can be explained, interpreted, and heard through multiple angles of its creative process and performance. www.saraserpa.com/

The configuration of voice, saxophone and cello exposes each instrument in a vulnerability that sometimes verges on discomfort, much like a Close Up photograph that is saturated with detail. As a trio, we are faced with the challenges of finding a way to work together while playing within this hyper-detailed setting and this uneasy close range. From within this exposure, we look for cohesion, and collective sound. I wrote the material, but the music took shape in the process of our rehearsals and the time we spent together, discussing and trying. The recording process, too, continued the concept of exposure. All of us were present in the same room as we recorded, taking away the possibility of correcting mistakes—no chance of going back.

The compositions themselves also reveal Close Ups of different episodes in my life. Each episode as it took place by itself felt simultaneously important and isolated. Put together the episodes create a whole—life itself, with its moments of joy and sadness.  The compositions assume the different languages from throughout my life. In English, my adopted second language, there are texts by two women whose writing I greatly admire: Virginia Woolf and philosopher and feminist Luce Irigaray. Portuguese, my mother tongue, appears in “Pássaros”, a poem by the late Ruy Bello, gone too soon. Departure from and avoidance of language is part of my work. When I come to sing or compose, in the moment I lack words, I sing sounds. Sounds that alone find their meaning. The wordless voice becomes another Close Up of a moment, emotion or expression. There are different challenges imposed on the voice in this music – to create a background, to hold down a bass line, to sing long tones that become textures, to traverse complex lines, to find its place without a harmonic instrument, to be independent, to feature as a solo, to act in ensemble. These are all challenging situations, from which I am continually learning: to find the place for my human voice.

Finally, at the time I was writing and working on this music, the film Close Up by Iranian director Abbas Kiarostami appeared in my life. The film was transformative for me, and has stayed alive in my mind as very few films are able to do. It is inspired by real life events and performed by the participants themselves—the people involved in the events become the subjects of the film. Subjects become objects, the viewers become the actors, and the actor(s) become(s) the director(s), as they reenact and reconstruct present and past events. Cinephile Sabzian fraudulently impersonates a well-known Iranian filmmaker to get access to a family’s house and daily private life. With the pretense that the family members and their house are ideal for his new film, he spends weeks in the house until his fraud is eventually discovered and he is taken to court. Sabzian is the anti-hero, in the sense that he lies and deceives.  And yet it is impossible to see him as a bad person. The way he naively speaks and behaves shows his humanity and suffering. In the film, while Sabzian is in the courtroom, in a real-life trial, Kiarostami interviews him, showing a Close Up pan of his face. 

In Close Up we, together, become actors and directors, performers and listeners, the others and ourselves. You too are part of this process. Thank you for listening.”

Sara Serpa is a singer, composer, improviser who implements a unique instrumental approach to her vocal style. Recognized for her distinctive wordless singing, Serpa has been immersed in the field of jazz, improvised and experimental music since first arriving in New York in 2008.  Described by JazzTimes magazine as “a master of wordless landscapes” and by the New York Times as “a singer of silvery poise and cosmopolitan outlook,” Serpa started her recording and performing career with jazz luminaries such as Grammy-nominated pianist, Danilo Perez, Guggenheim and MacArthur Fellow pianist, Ran Blake, and Greg Osby.

Her ethereal music draws from a broad variety of inspirations including literature, film, visual arts as well as history and nature. As a leader, she has produced and released nine albums, (with labels Sunnyside Records, Clean Feed, Tzadik and Inner Circle Music); the latest being “All The Dreams” in collaboration with guitarist André Matos. Serpa has collaborated with an extensive array of musicians including John Zorn, Guillermo Klein, Zeena Parkins, Mark Turner, Tyshawn Sorey, Nicole Mitchell, among many others.

She has performed her own music in Europe, Australia, North and South America, singing at international festivals such as Festa do Jazz, the Panama Jazz Festival, Festival de Jazz de Montevideo, Wangaratta Jazz Festival and Adelaide Festival, Sopot Jazz Festival or venues like Bimhuis, Casa da Música, Village Vanguard, Jazz Standard, The Stone, Brooklyn Academy of Music, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Kennedy Center for the Arts, among others.

Currently, Serpa leads a trio with Erik Friedlander (cello) and Ingrid Laubrock (tenor sax), with a debut album coming out in March 2018 (Close Up/ Clean Feed) , and a trio featuring Zeena Parkins (harp) and Mark Turner (tenor sax) in an interdisciplinary  performance, combining film with live music entitled “Recognition“.

Serpa’s innovative approach has been praised since her debut album Praia (2008) was released, as stated by All About Jazz: , she raises profound questions regarding the previous role of the vocalist in jazz. She sings as an instrumentalist, as a member of an ensemble with a bold conception not the star of some show.”

Serpa’s collaboration with her teacher/ mentor, Guggenheim and MacArthur Fellow pianist Ran Blake resulted in three recorded albums, providing fertile ground for the singer to explore/ interpret the Great American Songbook along with Film-Noir: Camera Obscura (2010), Aurora (2012), Kitano Noir (2015), the latter described by PopMatters as “wonderfully hypnotic”.

Sara Serpa is a member of Mycale, an international a-capella quartet commissioned by McArthur Fellow and avant-garde composer John Zorn whose newest release Gomory (2015) was praised by The New York Times as “astonishingly beautiful, a high point in the series; it sounds medieval and new at the same time.”

With literature has a source of inspiration, Serpa released the album Mobile (2011), title that refers to themes of travel and movement, reflects her passion for reading. Inspired by authors from Homer to Melville to V.S Naipaul, and featuring André Matos, Kris Davis, Ben Street and Ted Poor, it was noted as “work of art in motion” by the Chicago Jazz Magazine and outlined by JazzMan Magazine (France): “Serpa’s commitment to this special and difficult project works wonders – it would be difficult not surrender to it.”

Sara Serpa was the first Portuguese musician to ever perform at the renowned New York jazz venue, The Village Vanguard, in 2008 and 2009 with Greg Osby’s group. Serpa was voted as “Musician of the Year” in 2010 by the newspaper O Público, one of the major daily publications in Portugal, and was the cover of the U.S magazine Jazziz in 2012. Serpa has been voted and included by the DownBeat Magazine Critics Poll in the “Rising Star Vocalist” list in 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017.

Serpa’s accomplishments extend beyond the jazz world. Serpa has performed/ interpreted music of contemporary composers such as Andreia Pinto- Correia, Derek Bermel (with the Albany Symphony Orchestra, conducted by David Allan Miller), Aya Nishina (Flora (2014), and Joseph C. Phillips Jr. (Changing Same (2015).

A New England Conservatory Master of Music (MM) in Jazz Performance, and a graduate from ISPA (Portugal) in Social Work and Rehabilitation, the Portuguese singer completed her Piano and Classical Singing Studies at Lisbon National Conservatory. She later fell in love with Jazz and Improvisation through the Hot Clube de Portugal’s school, while working on her research thesis about Refugee Women in Portugal. She relocated to the United States in 2005 to attend Berklee College of Music, followed by New England Conservatory.

Source : Braitwaite and Katz.

World Poetry Celebrates the Amazing Phil Haynes!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ariadne’s Notes:  On May 17,  1:30 PM PST, the World Poetry Cafe , 100.5 FM , CFRO welcomed the talented drummer, composer and musician , Phil Haynes to the show. We were celebrating his two new CD’s, No Fast Food’s Settings For Three and My Favorite Things   which to me felt like a breath of much needed freedom. in this world. Our sound engineer Victor Swartzman especially enjoyed the slow Star Track theme which was played at the end.The CD’s are at www.cornerstorejazz.com/shop  Sales are used to help others create their CD’s. You can reach Phil at : philhaynes.com

Also on the show was a message from Alaha Ahrar, an interview with Koyali Burman and another story by Sharon Rowe from her Big Bessie Book: https://www.amazon.com/Big-Bessie-Stories-Sharon-Rowe/dp/1926457005/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1416163528&sr=1-2&keywords=big+Bessie

 

TO LISTEN TO THE SHOW CLICK HERE! 

 

 

 

 

 

Phil Haynes

Drummer/Composer Phil Haynes Explores ‘60s Rock Classics and Bold New Territory on Two New Recordings available June 1, 2018 

A veteran artist based in New York for 25 years, drummer/composer Phil Haynes is featured on more than 70 releases from numerous American and European record labels.  His collaborations include many of the seminal musicians of this generation: saxophonists Anthony Braxton, Ellery Eskelin, and David Liebman; trumpeters Dave Douglas, Herb Robertson, and Paul Smoker; bassists Mark Dresser, Ken Filiano, and Drew Gress; keyboard artists David Kikoski, Denman Maroney, and Michelle Rosewoman; vocalists Theo Bleckman, Nicholas Horner, and Hank Roberts; violinist Mark Feldman, and the composers collective Joint Venture. His current projects include the romantic “jazz-grass” string band, Free Country; the saxophone trio No Fast Food; bluesy power organ unit The Hammond Brothers, featuring young B-3 master Paul Bratcher; and the classic piano trio Day Dream, a cooperative with Yamaha artist Steve Rudolph.

My Favorite Things (1960-1969) takes on The Beatles, Hendrix, Coltrane, James Brown and more with “jazz-grass” string band Free Country with Hank Roberts, Jim Yanda, Drew Gress

No Fast Food’s Settings For Three sparks inspired improvisation

from bassist Drew Gress and NEA Jazz Master David Liebman

“[No Fast Food is] ridiculously good — One of the two best trios since the legendary Elvin Jones.” 

– CriticalJazz.com

“Just like Jack DeJohnette or Bob Moses, [Haynes] is broadening the beat by means of a significantly melodic component. You don’t have to be a prophet to foresee a great future.” — Heinrich Oehmsen, Szene

It’s not that he has anything against whiskers on kittens, mind you, but these are a few of drummer Phil Haynes’ favorite things: creating in the moment with old friends, who just happen to be some of the most inventive improvisers on the scene; digging deep into the rich musical legacy of the 1960s; navigating original compositions that offer tricky surprises and wide open spaces, just perfect for inspired spontaneity. With a wide-ranging pair of new releases featuring his bands Free Country and No Fast Food, Haynes gets to indulge all of those faves alongside an amazing crew sure to make you forget any dog bites or bee stings. Both are due for release on June 1, 2018 through Corner Store Jazz.

My Favorite Things (1960-1969) concludes a trilogy by Haynes’ free-wheeling “jazz-grass” string band Free Country, where he’s joined by longtime collaborators Hank Roberts (cello and vocals), Jim Yanda (guitar) and Drew Gress (bass). Released over nearly two decades, the band’s three albums encompass nearly the entire history of American popular music in their own irreverent, stripped-down fashion: their 1999 debut focused on pre-1900 tunes from the Revolutionary War to Stephen Foster; The Way the West Was Won took on the first half of the 20th century, with cowboy songs and Hollywood movie soundtracks.

The concluding chapter narrows the focus to a single decade, but what a decade: over the course of two discs, the quartet takes on everything from John Coltrane, The Beatles and Jimi Hendrix to Burt Bacharach and the theme from Star Trek – as Haynes himself puts it, “you’ve got everything from schmaltz to the highest art.”

Beyond the fact that the ‘60s were the formative years for the band’s members, the decade is so ripe for extensive reinvention because, Haynes explains, “It was our last cultural revolution. This is the last decade that everybody agrees on, so this is a look at that psychedelic, diverse musical landscape. We face many of the same questions now that we faced then, and it will be interesting to see if there’s another social revolution.”

If there is, Free Country is here to provide the soundtrack. With Roberts’ wry baritone, the knotty interaction of the strings, Haynes’ loose-limbed, evocative percussion, and a profound conversational spark forged over decades of collaboration and the magical live sound born of recording in the round, the band captures the spirit of the 1960s with the urgency of now. “The ‘60s had this great American outpouring of creativity,” Haynes says. “There was music that everybody shared: Santana and The Beatles knew about A Love Supreme, from Hendrix to what Bernstein did on Broadway, everything was changing. This band focuses all those things into one sound.”

Haynes – My Favorite Things, Settings for Three                                           On the opposite end of the creative spectrum, No Fast Food, with Gress and NEA Jazz Master David Liebman, was formed as an outlet for Haynes’ compositions. The trio’s third album, Settings For Three, is their first not recorded in concert but carries the electricity of their live performances into the studio. As the straightforward title implies, the intent was simply to provide fodder for the three musicians’ estimable improvisational gifts, or as Haynes puts it, “I wanted to give the guys some new settings to play in and also familiar territory to romp in.”

The opening track, “El Smoke,” takes its name and inspiration from a different group – Haynes’ collective quartet Joint Venture, where he and Gress are joined by saxophonist Ellery Eskelin and trumpeter Paul Smoker. Of course, No Fast Food make it utterly their own, ranging from the atmospheric to the rhapsodic over the track’s ten minutes. Haynes has written lyrics for the second tune, “Joy,” though they’re not sung on the recording. No matter, as Lieb and Gress seem to have absorbed the composer’s poetic meaning, which looks at the many different sides of joy, from the outwardly ecstatic to the more profound and complicated.

“There’s joy as we know it,” Haynes says, “but then there are all these other shadow aspects of joy. I really appreciated how the guys played on it because they reveal those different depths: not just that first expression but then all the ripples that happen beyond that.”

Speaking of multi-faceted, the blues offers an endless supply of variations and possibilities, and that’s certainly the case with the wide-open “Blue Dop.” High-spirited and grooving in this rendition, it’s a piece that suggests myriad approaches and changes each time the trio launches into it. The onomatopoeic “Whack Whap” shows off the mirth and humor that the three can share, a wild avalanche of sounds and sonic surprises.

“Longer Shorter” pays homage to Wayne Shorter, taking the legendary saxophonist’s composition “Pinocchio” as a starting point. The hard-driving, sharp-angled tune nods toward Liebman’s history with Miles Davis and Elvin Jones while spotlighting his singular approach to the soprano. The ballad “String Theory,” which kicks off with Liebman conjuring fluttering bird calls on flute, is a vehicle for Gress’ poignant arco emoting. To close the album, “Shramba” takes a different twist on the samba, progressing through all twelve keys over Haynes’ rollicking rhythmic bed.

Through the simultaneous release of these two thrilling albums, Haynes provides a study of two facets of his expansive musical personality. Both are wildly inventive and thrive on the personal interactions of the musicians involved, but where My Favorite Things is subversively accessible, Settings For Three is an enticing challenge. “You’ve got one group where the universe is the option,” Haynes says, “and another group where the microcosm is the universe. They’re very different kinds of playing yet you look for freedom in both.”

Source with thanks: Braitwaite and Katz