Tag Archives: International Peace Award Ariadne Sawyer

World Poetry Celebrates the Talented Chris Bailey!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ariadne’s Notes: The World Poetry Café Radio Show welcomed two very special guests December 6, 1-2 pm PST on CFRO 100.5 FM.
Calling in at 1:10 PM PST was the lovely Nigerian, Canadian filmmaker Shasha Nakhai with her new doc, Take Light which will be shown on the documentary channel at 9 pm across Canada on Sunday December 9. https://www.takelightfilm.com/

Our second caller at 1:30 PM PST was the talented poet from PEI, Chris Bailey with his new book: What Your Hands Have Done by Nightwood Editions , www.nightwoodeditiond.com The book is a masterful portrayal of fisherman and family as well as a vivid description of culture. Having lived in Kodiak, Alaska among fisherman, I was fascinated by certain similarities, among them being fiercely independent and proud of their lifestyle.
For the first time we welcomed a girl nature poet Tshering Zangmo Namsa from Bhutan with her moving poem on unity. Thanks to Victor Schwartzman , our technical engineer for reading her poem.
We read two poems from n’s new groundbreaking book, Caution: Deep Water about the concerns of seniors and retirement living.
CD music was by Stan Rogers and Djelimady Tounkara. A special treat was a beautiful Seasons Greeting From Yoshifumi Sakura , World Poetry Music Director and composer of our anthem as well as a great postcard and message from World Poetry Correspondent, Rui Carvalho with a message in Portuguese “Tudo De Boh or “All the Best”. Author Sharon Rowe had a brand new story for her second book: Big Bessie Goes to Mars, read by Victor Schwartzman.

LISTEN TO THE SHOW HERE!

 

 

 

 

Chris Bailey is a fisherman and award winning author from North Lake , Prince Edward  Island, He has an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Guelph and is a past recipient of the Milton Acorn Award. His work has appeared in numerous journals .

HAVE A COOKIE

The way your father tells you is simple. To the point.
Speaking with the tone he’d use to say the direction
of the tides, what your brother Tom in Fort Mac said,
or describing the noise the truck axle makes.

His hand on the thing sprouting from his neck:
The doctor says it’s probably cancer. They’re cutting
it off next week. A strip of paper towel in front of him.
A cup filled with tea. A new pack of cookies that rattles

when he reaches in, not looking at you. He endures
your stunned silence, says, I asked if he had his pocket
knife on him, said he could do it right there
if he wanted. Then: Sit down, boy. Have a cookie.

Not knowing what else to do or say, you sit.
Take a cookie. The kind with icing in the middle. One
half vanilla, the other chocolate. He fills ice cream
dishes with these for long days on the boat.

Something to snack on when working in the sun.
You snap the cookie in two, then four, and stare
a while at what your hands have done.

Chris Bailey (C) all rights reserved.

World Poetry Celebrates Filmmaker Shasha Nakhai !

 

 

 

 

Ariadne’s Notes: The World Poetry Café Radio Show welcomed two very special guests December 6, 1-2 pm PST on CFRO 100.5 FM.

Calling in at 1:10 PM PST was the lovely Nigerian, Canadian filmmaker Shasha Nakhai with her new doc, Take Light which will be shown on the documentary channel at 9 pm across Canada on Sunday December 9. Be sure to see this fascinating film about Nigeria and electricity . For more information: https://www.takelightfilm.com/

Our second caller at 1:30 PM PST was the talented poet from PEI, Chris Bailey with his new book: What Your Hands Have Done by Nightwood Editions , www.nightwoodeditiond.com The book is a masterful portrayal of fisherman and family as well as a vivid description of culture. Having lived in Kodiak, Alaska among fisherman, I was fascinated by certain similarities, among them being  fiercely independent and proud of their lifestyle.

For the first time we welcomed a girl nature poet Tshering Zangmo Namsa from Bhutan with her moving poem on unity. Thanks to Victor Schwartzman , our technical engineer for reading her poem.

We read two poems from Katherine Gordon’s new  groundbreaking book, Caution: Deep Water about the concerns of seniors and retirement living.

CD music was by Stan Rogers and Djelimady Tounkara. A special treat was a beautiful Seasons Greeting From Yoshifumi Sakura , World Poetry Music Director and composer of our anthem as well as a great postcard and message from World Poetry Correspondent, Rui Carvalho with a message in Portuguese “Tudo De Boh or “All the Best”. Author Sharon Rowe had a brand new story for her second book: Big Bessie Goes to Mars, read by Victor Schwartzman.

 

 

 

This was my last radio show until January 3, 2019. Next week, my co-host author of numerous books and university professor, Diego Bastianutti will be hosting and the following two weeks, our great sound engineer Victor Schwartzman will be in charge.
It was a special show for me for several reasons and the two gifts I valued the most were two e-mail messages from youth in different countries that said “Thank you for believing in me.”

LISTEN TO THE SHOW HERE!

 

 

 

 

From Storyline Entertainment: 

“From space, at night, Nigeria is awash in light. But the glow almost entirely flares from oil and gas wells. The country, with the world’s largest proven oil reserves, leaves half its population without electricity, and the rest with erratic service.
In Take Light, the feature directorial debut from Shasha Nakhai, takes us to her hometown in the country where she grew up, Port Harcourt, Nigeria, the ironically-nicknamed “Garden City” where the skies have turned grey.
There, she follows the lives of workers for PHED, the previously state-owned Port Harcourt Electricity Distribution Company (PHED) which was privatized in 2013. If any public servants anywhere feel unappreciated, they should compare their lot with the likes of Martins, an unflaggingly upbeat and religious family-man and electrical engineer, or Deborah, a sales-representative-turned-debt-collector.
Both face anger and even mob violence on a daily basis as they cut off service to delinquent customers (most of whom have little ability to pay, in a country with 7.5 million jobless). Martins, who has miraculously survived electrocution in the past, climbs poles to cut off dangerous makeshift wiring that is used to steal power. (We also meet Godwin, an “illegal electrician,” who invariably reconnects the “People’s Power” the following night).
The powerlessness closes businesses and forces people to use generators when they can (often bringing them indoors where they often succumb to fires and carbon monoxide poisoning). Even hospitals fall prey, unable to maintain refrigeration in their morgue, forcing them to “dry embalm” corpses.
Meanwhile, at the central power distribution plant, we meet Gbadamosi, who commits himself to trying to keep power flowing, despite demand that is almost four times capacity, and outright shutdowns as militants in the Niger Delta blow up pipelines.
And to provide sardonic counterpoint, we see the YouTube podcasts of James and Harry, two Nigerians who angrily mock PHED and their employees, and the privateers and the government, providing a loudspeaker to popular frustration in Nigeria.
“Port Harcourt is the source of my fondest childhood memories,” says Nakhai, who produced the Oscar short-listed Frame 394. “Today, however, the city is much different than what I remember. Perfectly manicured green hedges have turned to black dust—the fallout zone of a fossil-fuel economy.
“Take Light is a film about Nigeria’s energy crisis, with my hometown as the backdrop. It’s about a crisis of electrical energy, but also about other kinds of power struggles – the tensions between people, between past and present, between governments and colonial powers—and about the transformation of it all into a seething, powerful force.
“I want to show the urgency and challenges of transitioning to greener and more egalitarian economies.
“But, this is also a film about the power of hope. With people like Martins, it is about keeping the candle lit in times of darkness and despair, about fighting to remain a good person when corruption is the status-quo, and harnessing the power of humour and religion to make it through each day.” A web of corruption and anger leaves 50% of Nigerians without electricity in Africa’s largest energy-producing country.
Take Light was produced by Storyline Entertainment in association with the Documentary Channel, and the participation of the Telefilm Canada and the Rogers Group of Funds through the Theatrical Documentary Program, Canada Media Fund, the Ontario Media Development Corporation, Rogers Telefund, The Canadian Film or Video Production Tax Credit and the Ontario Media Development Corporation Film and Television Tax Credits, with the assistance of the Hot Docs Ted Rogers Documentary Fund, and Compy Films.

Shasha Nakhai is a filmmaker based out of Toronto with Compy Films and Storyline Entertainment. Her award-winning films have screened at festivals and aired on TV worldwide, been released on iTunes, gone viral and been awarded Vimeo Staff Pick and Short of the Week. Her last film with partner Rich Williamson, Frame 394, was shortlisted for the 2017 Academy Award for Best Documentary Short and is part of the CBC’s new Digital Doc Shorts initiative. It had its world premiere at the 2016 Hot Docs Film Festival, was named one of TIFF’s Top 10 Films of 2016, and was nominated for 2 Canadian Screen Awards. Shasha was 1 of 8 emerging producers selected for the DOC Institute’s Breakthrough Program in 2015, and was awarded Telefilm Canada’s Pay It Forward Prize as part of the Hot Docs Film Festival’s Don Haig Award. Having graduated from Ryerson University’s Broadcast Journalism program, she was born in the Philippines, grew up in Nigeria and came to Canada as an international student in 2003.

This film skillfully blended together the different characters and points of view including  comedy and poetry. I would like to congratulate Shasha Nakhai  and all those involved in the film for their work in presenting a tapestry that educates, informs and entertains the audience.

World Poetry Celebrates the Talented Diego Bastinutti !

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ariadne’s Notes.
The World Poetry Café Radio Show welcomed our popular co-host and noted author Diego Bastianutti , November 29 , 1:00 PM PST in a special launch of his new book, Lost in Transit now available on Amazon. It shows the effect on changing countries as well as when he met his wife, she rescued him from being lost.
Also on the show, at 1:40 PM PST Darrel Katz with his new CD, Rats on No Evil Star , a beautiful combination of music and a tribute to his late wife the talented poet Paula Tatarunis .

The opening poem ACADEMIC TESTS by Sahaj Sabharwal, who is a student. He writes: “I love writing poems and thoughts. I am from Jammu city, Jammu and Kashmir, India.” His poem was read by our great tech Victor Schwartzman who keeps our show on the air.
We would also like to welcome three new countries to our listening audience: Bhutan, Melawi and  Kazakhstan bringing our total to 118.

LISTEN TO THE SHOW HERE! ***

 

 

 

Diego Bastianutti, from Fiume, Italy, has crossed many borders separating States as well as “states of being.” He is at ease with various languages and cultures. A retired Professor of Spanish and Italian literature, and former Honorary Vice Consul of Italy.The recent joint exhibition on the theme of Vancouver Downtown Eastside has been received in Vancouver and in Italy with deep sensitivity and appreciation.

He has received wide recognition here and abroad for his work as a writer, poet and translator. Among his works he counts five volumes of poetry and his awarded book A Major Selection of the Poetry of Giuseppe Ungaretti. Currently he is a Canadian correspondent for an Italian literary magazine in San José, Costa Rica, and a member of various writers’ associations. His writings have become material of study in a graduate course offered at the University of Toronto. A forthcoming book published by the University of Toronto Press will feature an entire chapter on Bastianutti the poet and writer.

Above the Horizon

In never-ending thirst
the desert dances on thorns of love
shadows upon shadows entwining
flesh over enfolding flesh

She lets him take her like the night
swallows the sun in the lunar tidal heartbeat
with his sky planted in her body
she howls like the moon melting into the sea
a lashing whip, a swirl of colors
on its fevered tip

Becalmed she brings him in
whispering his name
as he reads forgotten messages
on her veined wrists

©Diego Bastianutti. All rights reserved by the author