Tag Archives: Katherine Gordon

World Poetry Celebrates Filmmaker Shasha Nakhai !

 

 

 

 

Ariadne’s Notes: The World Poetry Café Radio Show welcomed two very special guests December 6, 1-2 pm PST on CFRO 100.5 FM.

Calling in at 1:10 PM PST was the lovely Nigerian, Canadian filmmaker Shasha Nakhai with her new doc, Take Light which will be shown on the documentary channel at 9 pm across Canada on Sunday December 9. Be sure to see this fascinating film about Nigeria and electricity . For more information: https://www.takelightfilm.com/

Our second caller at 1:30 PM PST was the talented poet from PEI, Chris Bailey with his new book: What Your Hands Have Done by Nightwood Editions , www.nightwoodeditiond.com The book is a masterful portrayal of fisherman and family as well as a vivid description of culture. Having lived in Kodiak, Alaska among fisherman, I was fascinated by certain similarities, among them being  fiercely independent and proud of their lifestyle.

For the first time we welcomed a girl nature poet Tshering Zangmo Namsa from Bhutan with her moving poem on unity. Thanks to Victor Schwartzman , our technical engineer for reading her poem.

We read two poems from Katherine Gordon’s new  groundbreaking book, Caution: Deep Water about the concerns of seniors and retirement living.

CD music was by Stan Rogers and Djelimady Tounkara. A special treat was a beautiful Seasons Greeting From Yoshifumi Sakura , World Poetry Music Director and composer of our anthem as well as a great postcard and message from World Poetry Correspondent, Rui Carvalho with a message in Portuguese “Tudo De Boh or “All the Best”. Author Sharon Rowe had a brand new story for her second book: Big Bessie Goes to Mars, read by Victor Schwartzman.

 

 

 

This was my last radio show until January 3, 2019. Next week, my co-host author of numerous books and university professor, Diego Bastianutti will be hosting and the following two weeks, our great sound engineer Victor Schwartzman will be in charge.
It was a special show for me for several reasons and the two gifts I valued the most were two e-mail messages from youth in different countries that said “Thank you for believing in me.”

LISTEN TO THE SHOW HERE!

 

 

 

 

From Storyline Entertainment: 

“From space, at night, Nigeria is awash in light. But the glow almost entirely flares from oil and gas wells. The country, with the world’s largest proven oil reserves, leaves half its population without electricity, and the rest with erratic service.
In Take Light, the feature directorial debut from Shasha Nakhai, takes us to her hometown in the country where she grew up, Port Harcourt, Nigeria, the ironically-nicknamed “Garden City” where the skies have turned grey.
There, she follows the lives of workers for PHED, the previously state-owned Port Harcourt Electricity Distribution Company (PHED) which was privatized in 2013. If any public servants anywhere feel unappreciated, they should compare their lot with the likes of Martins, an unflaggingly upbeat and religious family-man and electrical engineer, or Deborah, a sales-representative-turned-debt-collector.
Both face anger and even mob violence on a daily basis as they cut off service to delinquent customers (most of whom have little ability to pay, in a country with 7.5 million jobless). Martins, who has miraculously survived electrocution in the past, climbs poles to cut off dangerous makeshift wiring that is used to steal power. (We also meet Godwin, an “illegal electrician,” who invariably reconnects the “People’s Power” the following night).
The powerlessness closes businesses and forces people to use generators when they can (often bringing them indoors where they often succumb to fires and carbon monoxide poisoning). Even hospitals fall prey, unable to maintain refrigeration in their morgue, forcing them to “dry embalm” corpses.
Meanwhile, at the central power distribution plant, we meet Gbadamosi, who commits himself to trying to keep power flowing, despite demand that is almost four times capacity, and outright shutdowns as militants in the Niger Delta blow up pipelines.
And to provide sardonic counterpoint, we see the YouTube podcasts of James and Harry, two Nigerians who angrily mock PHED and their employees, and the privateers and the government, providing a loudspeaker to popular frustration in Nigeria.
“Port Harcourt is the source of my fondest childhood memories,” says Nakhai, who produced the Oscar short-listed Frame 394. “Today, however, the city is much different than what I remember. Perfectly manicured green hedges have turned to black dust—the fallout zone of a fossil-fuel economy.
“Take Light is a film about Nigeria’s energy crisis, with my hometown as the backdrop. It’s about a crisis of electrical energy, but also about other kinds of power struggles – the tensions between people, between past and present, between governments and colonial powers—and about the transformation of it all into a seething, powerful force.
“I want to show the urgency and challenges of transitioning to greener and more egalitarian economies.
“But, this is also a film about the power of hope. With people like Martins, it is about keeping the candle lit in times of darkness and despair, about fighting to remain a good person when corruption is the status-quo, and harnessing the power of humour and religion to make it through each day.” A web of corruption and anger leaves 50% of Nigerians without electricity in Africa’s largest energy-producing country.
Take Light was produced by Storyline Entertainment in association with the Documentary Channel, and the participation of the Telefilm Canada and the Rogers Group of Funds through the Theatrical Documentary Program, Canada Media Fund, the Ontario Media Development Corporation, Rogers Telefund, The Canadian Film or Video Production Tax Credit and the Ontario Media Development Corporation Film and Television Tax Credits, with the assistance of the Hot Docs Ted Rogers Documentary Fund, and Compy Films.

Shasha Nakhai is a filmmaker based out of Toronto with Compy Films and Storyline Entertainment. Her award-winning films have screened at festivals and aired on TV worldwide, been released on iTunes, gone viral and been awarded Vimeo Staff Pick and Short of the Week. Her last film with partner Rich Williamson, Frame 394, was shortlisted for the 2017 Academy Award for Best Documentary Short and is part of the CBC’s new Digital Doc Shorts initiative. It had its world premiere at the 2016 Hot Docs Film Festival, was named one of TIFF’s Top 10 Films of 2016, and was nominated for 2 Canadian Screen Awards. Shasha was 1 of 8 emerging producers selected for the DOC Institute’s Breakthrough Program in 2015, and was awarded Telefilm Canada’s Pay It Forward Prize as part of the Hot Docs Film Festival’s Don Haig Award. Having graduated from Ryerson University’s Broadcast Journalism program, she was born in the Philippines, grew up in Nigeria and came to Canada as an international student in 2003.

This film skillfully blended together the different characters and points of view including  comedy and poetry. I would like to congratulate Shasha Nakhai  and all those involved in the film for their work in presenting a tapestry that educates, informs and entertains the audience.

World Poetry Celebates Jerry Wemple and Lawrence Knorr!

 

 

 

 

 

*Hope by Neamat Haidari. Hope for a better future*

Ariadne’s Notes: On October 11, 1-2 pm PST, we welcomed two important guests to the  World Poetry Café Radio Show. Referrals from World Poetry Media Correspondent Melanie Simms. College professor and award winning poet Jerry Wimple share his thoughts on writing poetry and also mentioned that some of his students , when asked how they spent their vacations or weekends answered that they only stay home so that they can be safe. It is so sad that it is unsafe from them to go out except to go to school. It was a fascinating interview and is worth listening to. One of his poems is below.

Unfortunately, the publisher Laurence Knorr was not able to get through but we hope to welcome him at another time. Rounding out the show was an e-poem by Katherine Gordon from her upcoming book Caution, Deep Water and Creative Tips on Publishing from Creativity Rocks by Ariadne Sawyer.

***A reminder that the World Poetry Café is fundraising to keep us on the air. If you appreciate the volunteer work that we do, bringing poets, creators and artists cross the world and want to contribute to keep our 20 year old show on the air, please go to www.coopradio.org and click on members, donations.  Please also put in the name of our show so that the money can be credited to our account.  WE NEED YOUR HELP! It costs $1,000 per year to keep the show on air and we are all volunteers. In return, you will get two interviews per year and membership on our upcoming WP Media Page. ***

TO HEAR THE SHOW CLICK HERE!!!

 

 

A Pennsylvania native, Jerry Wemple writes frequently about the people and places of the Susquehanna Valley region. His work includes three poetry collections: You Can See It from Here, selected by Pulitzer Prize-winner Yusef Komunyakaa for the Naomi Long Madgett Poetry Award, The Civil War in Baltimore, and most recently The Artemas Poems. He is co-editor of the anthology Common Wealth: Contemporary Poets on Pennsylvania. His poetry and creative nonfiction work appear in numerous journals and anthologies, and have been published internationally in Ireland, Chile, Spain, and Germany.

Wemple, a Professor of English at Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania, is the recipient of several awards for writing and teaching including a Fellowship in Literature from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts and the Word Journal chapbook prize. He received the Dean’s Salute to Excellence for his teaching and scholarship at Bloomsburg, the Bloomsburg University Institute for Culture and Society award for Outstanding Creative Work, and the Jack and Helen Evans Endowed Faculty Fellowship.

Nickel Rides

I.
Back in the days when your grandfather’s father,
maybe his father, was a young man down at the shore
amusement piers or the scruffy city lots over near

the wrong side of town, they used to call them nickel rides:
steel boxes jacking up and down, bucking around,
make your back feel like it was worked over with crowbar,

your hips like they was smacked with a plank.
Back in my day, word was out about those nickel rides
on the Philly streets. I was in from the country, hard

down by the river and the woods, but even
I knew what was what. Saw clear enough that one day
while stretching my legs near the 30th Street station

waiting in between long-run trains, when the paddy wagon
pulled up and four cops jumped out, jumped a man I hardly
noticed, whacking him good with long sticks. I figured soon

enough that I needed to take a left, cross the street,
head up another, act like never saw nothing, especially
a side-vision glance of him being cuffed and dumped

in the back of the wagon for a nickel ride. That unit
screech-lurching down the street like the driver wanted
to bust the brakes and run out all the gas all at once.

II.
First off, the war on drugs is a concept. There ain’t a war on drugs;
there’s a war on people. All wars have casualties, atrocities.
All wars have losers. Only some wars have winners. Tonight

I see Charm City up in flames. Orange tongues of fire taunt
us from brick buildings. The old people say it’s just as it was
back as the King riot, nearly fifty years ago. They say

the neighborhood ain’t changed much since those days.
We had one good store. Now it’s burnt. Kids too young to remember
Tupac let alone Reverend King dodge in and out of focus,

Jerry Wimple (C) All rights reserved by author.

 

 

 

Lawrence Knorr has been involved with book publishing for thirteen years. He founded Sunbury Press in 2004. He holds an MBA from Penn State University, and is a Project Management Professional (PMP). Lawrence’s 30+ year career in information technology, as a programmer, analyst, project manager, CEO and Chief Information Officer has prepared him well for the “Age of Content” – the new era of eBooks, data integration, eCommerce and networks. Lawrence has taught business and project management courses for ten years, and is the author of eight books. He is also an award-winning digital artist. For a one-year term in 2013, Lawrence was the President of the MidAtlantic Book Publishers Association (MBPA).
About Sunbury Press:
“Sunbury Press, Inc., headquartered in Mechanicsburg, PA is a publisher of trade paperback, hard cover and digital books featuring established and emerging authors in many fiction and nonfiction categories. Sunbury’s books are sold through leading booksellers worldwidSunbury Press is a traditional publisher leveraging digital capabilities. We receive approximately 1000 proposals from authors and agents over the course of a year. We publish about 70 titles per year, a good number of them from our existing authors. Thus, our selection rate is about 5%. Our most successful categories have been history, biography, self-help, historical fiction, horror, police procedurals and mysteries. Our editing and design staff are employees of the company. When we invest in a manuscript with our time and money, our goal is to produce the best quality book possible while getting it to the market as quickly as possible.
Our books are sold on all major bookseller websites and eBook platforms. Our best-selling titles are distributed to stores and libraries via Baker & Taylor and Ingram”

World Poetry Celebrates a Book Launch with Kevin Morris!

 

Ariadne’s Notes:  On May 4, 1-2 pm PST, the World Poetry Café Radio Show (CFRO 100.5 FM)  Celebrated  the unique and talented poet  Kevin Morris  and his new book a collection of poetry, “My Old Clock I Wind and Other Poems” will be published, by Moyhill Publishing in May/June 2017, in both print and e-book formats. Podcast:

https://newauthoronline.com/2017/05/05/a-podcast-of-poet-kevin-morriss-interview-on-vancouver-co-op-radios-the-world-poetry-reading-series-on-4-may-is-now-available/

It was a wonderful show, full of poetry and insights about poetry and editing. Also Kevin kindly offered to help other creators with disabilities to contact him at https://newauthoronline.com/ Follow him on Twitter: https://twitter.com/drewdog2060_ 

Poetic News:   From Katherine Gordon’s collective and edited book of poems Piping at End of Days (Valley Press) we had Chris Faiers who was featured in the book with his poem:  “Five Minutes Ago They Dropped the Bomb”  He says: “ The poem which coined the term EQ in 1984′. The poem is far more important than I am as a poet or a list of my literary credits. The substantiation for the claim that this poem created the term EQ, and the now much popularized concept of emotional intelligence, is in the link to my blog posting in the email  http://www.eelpie.org/cricket/faiers_biog.htm Also a poem by Katherine Gordon  The Silver Pipers of UR, was read. World Poetry Theme Music by  Musical Ambassador and Director Yoshifumi Sakura was also played.

The World Poetry Team: Host and producer, Ariadne Sawyer, MA, co-host Anita Aguirre Nieveras, super tech Victor Schwartzman plus volunteers Sharon Rowe and dog Willow.

To hear this amazing show: CLICK HERE!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kevin Morris was born in Liverpool (UK) on 6 January 1969.

Kevin lost the majority of his eyesight at 18-months-old due to a blood clot.

He is a braille user and has happy memories of leafing through “The Oxford Book of English Verse” and other poetry collections in the school library.

 Kevin read history and politics at University College Swansea and graduated with a BA (joint hons) and a MA in political theory.

In 1994 Kevin moved to London where he now lives and works. He began writing poetry in 2012. Most of Kevin’s poems can be found on his website, https://newauthoronline.com/

which also contains links to his published works.  His Twitter account: https://twitter.com/drewdog2060_  

Much of Kevin’s poetry is inspired by the environment. He lives close to an historic park in the Upper Norwood/Crystal Palace area (a suburb of London).

Upper Norwood derives it’s name from the Great North Wood and remains of the greenest parts of greater London.

Being visually impaired Kevin uses Job Access with Speech or JAWS software which converts text into speech and braille enabling him to use a standard Windows

computer or laptop.

Kevin’s forthcoming collection of poetry, “My Old Clock I Wind and Other Poems” will be published, by Moyhill Publishing in May/June 2017, in both print and e-book formats.

 

Shall I Sit Out This Dance?

 

Shall I sit out this dance,

As the dancers prance

Heedlessly by?

Why,

On occasions, can I not join in

With my companions and grin?

 

The song

Of the throng

Helps me forget;

And yet

I am not as other men,

For when

I smile

There is, all the while,

Within

The knowledge of this temporary din.

 

Others see it too;

But construe

Me speaking of such a thing

As bad form and bring

The conversation around

To matters less profound.

But, when they are alone,

Do they not think on skin and bone?

 

I can reduce my companions to laughter

With my jokes, but after

Our fun

Is done,

Closing time will come.

Kevin Morris (C) All rights reserved by the author.