Tag Archives: Sharon Rowe

World Poetry Celebrates Filmmaker Shasha Nakhai !

 

 

 

 

Ariadne’s Notes: The World Poetry Café Radio Show welcomed two very special guests December 6, 1-2 pm PST on CFRO 100.5 FM.

Calling in at 1:10 PM PST was the lovely Nigerian, Canadian filmmaker Shasha Nakhai with her new doc, Take Light which will be shown on the documentary channel at 9 pm across Canada on Sunday December 9. Be sure to see this fascinating film about Nigeria and electricity . For more information: https://www.takelightfilm.com/

Our second caller at 1:30 PM PST was the talented poet from PEI, Chris Bailey with his new book: What Your Hands Have Done by Nightwood Editions , www.nightwoodeditiond.com The book is a masterful portrayal of fisherman and family as well as a vivid description of culture. Having lived in Kodiak, Alaska among fisherman, I was fascinated by certain similarities, among them being  fiercely independent and proud of their lifestyle.

For the first time we welcomed a girl nature poet Tshering Zangmo Namsa from Bhutan with her moving poem on unity. Thanks to Victor Schwartzman , our technical engineer for reading her poem.

We read two poems from Katherine Gordon’s new  groundbreaking book, Caution: Deep Water about the concerns of seniors and retirement living.

CD music was by Stan Rogers and Djelimady Tounkara. A special treat was a beautiful Seasons Greeting From Yoshifumi Sakura , World Poetry Music Director and composer of our anthem as well as a great postcard and message from World Poetry Correspondent, Rui Carvalho with a message in Portuguese “Tudo De Boh or “All the Best”. Author Sharon Rowe had a brand new story for her second book: Big Bessie Goes to Mars, read by Victor Schwartzman.

 

 

 

This was my last radio show until January 3, 2019. Next week, my co-host author of numerous books and university professor, Diego Bastianutti will be hosting and the following two weeks, our great sound engineer Victor Schwartzman will be in charge.
It was a special show for me for several reasons and the two gifts I valued the most were two e-mail messages from youth in different countries that said “Thank you for believing in me.”

LISTEN TO THE SHOW HERE!

 

 

 

 

From Storyline Entertainment: 

“From space, at night, Nigeria is awash in light. But the glow almost entirely flares from oil and gas wells. The country, with the world’s largest proven oil reserves, leaves half its population without electricity, and the rest with erratic service.
In Take Light, the feature directorial debut from Shasha Nakhai, takes us to her hometown in the country where she grew up, Port Harcourt, Nigeria, the ironically-nicknamed “Garden City” where the skies have turned grey.
There, she follows the lives of workers for PHED, the previously state-owned Port Harcourt Electricity Distribution Company (PHED) which was privatized in 2013. If any public servants anywhere feel unappreciated, they should compare their lot with the likes of Martins, an unflaggingly upbeat and religious family-man and electrical engineer, or Deborah, a sales-representative-turned-debt-collector.
Both face anger and even mob violence on a daily basis as they cut off service to delinquent customers (most of whom have little ability to pay, in a country with 7.5 million jobless). Martins, who has miraculously survived electrocution in the past, climbs poles to cut off dangerous makeshift wiring that is used to steal power. (We also meet Godwin, an “illegal electrician,” who invariably reconnects the “People’s Power” the following night).
The powerlessness closes businesses and forces people to use generators when they can (often bringing them indoors where they often succumb to fires and carbon monoxide poisoning). Even hospitals fall prey, unable to maintain refrigeration in their morgue, forcing them to “dry embalm” corpses.
Meanwhile, at the central power distribution plant, we meet Gbadamosi, who commits himself to trying to keep power flowing, despite demand that is almost four times capacity, and outright shutdowns as militants in the Niger Delta blow up pipelines.
And to provide sardonic counterpoint, we see the YouTube podcasts of James and Harry, two Nigerians who angrily mock PHED and their employees, and the privateers and the government, providing a loudspeaker to popular frustration in Nigeria.
“Port Harcourt is the source of my fondest childhood memories,” says Nakhai, who produced the Oscar short-listed Frame 394. “Today, however, the city is much different than what I remember. Perfectly manicured green hedges have turned to black dust—the fallout zone of a fossil-fuel economy.
“Take Light is a film about Nigeria’s energy crisis, with my hometown as the backdrop. It’s about a crisis of electrical energy, but also about other kinds of power struggles – the tensions between people, between past and present, between governments and colonial powers—and about the transformation of it all into a seething, powerful force.
“I want to show the urgency and challenges of transitioning to greener and more egalitarian economies.
“But, this is also a film about the power of hope. With people like Martins, it is about keeping the candle lit in times of darkness and despair, about fighting to remain a good person when corruption is the status-quo, and harnessing the power of humour and religion to make it through each day.” A web of corruption and anger leaves 50% of Nigerians without electricity in Africa’s largest energy-producing country.
Take Light was produced by Storyline Entertainment in association with the Documentary Channel, and the participation of the Telefilm Canada and the Rogers Group of Funds through the Theatrical Documentary Program, Canada Media Fund, the Ontario Media Development Corporation, Rogers Telefund, The Canadian Film or Video Production Tax Credit and the Ontario Media Development Corporation Film and Television Tax Credits, with the assistance of the Hot Docs Ted Rogers Documentary Fund, and Compy Films.

Shasha Nakhai is a filmmaker based out of Toronto with Compy Films and Storyline Entertainment. Her award-winning films have screened at festivals and aired on TV worldwide, been released on iTunes, gone viral and been awarded Vimeo Staff Pick and Short of the Week. Her last film with partner Rich Williamson, Frame 394, was shortlisted for the 2017 Academy Award for Best Documentary Short and is part of the CBC’s new Digital Doc Shorts initiative. It had its world premiere at the 2016 Hot Docs Film Festival, was named one of TIFF’s Top 10 Films of 2016, and was nominated for 2 Canadian Screen Awards. Shasha was 1 of 8 emerging producers selected for the DOC Institute’s Breakthrough Program in 2015, and was awarded Telefilm Canada’s Pay It Forward Prize as part of the Hot Docs Film Festival’s Don Haig Award. Having graduated from Ryerson University’s Broadcast Journalism program, she was born in the Philippines, grew up in Nigeria and came to Canada as an international student in 2003.

This film skillfully blended together the different characters and points of view including  comedy and poetry. I would like to congratulate Shasha Nakhai  and all those involved in the film for their work in presenting a tapestry that educates, informs and entertains the audience.

World Poetry Celebrates the Talented Musician Peter Nelson!

Ariadne’s Notes. On November 15, CFRO 100.5 FM,  The World Poetry Café welcomed  the amazing Peter Nelson who called in at 1:30 PM PST to talk about his own journey of healing from a debilitating illness and his new CD Ash, Dust and the Chalkboard Cinema which  beautifully illustrates healing through his music and brings a message of balance , listening to the body and spirit. This interview meant a lot to me since I had gone through a difficult recovery from polio for many years which gave me ongoing challenges. Peter’s story has given me ongoing hope for recovery. Peter comes to us courtesy of Braitwaite and Katz. World Poetry Contributors: Alaha Ahar from Afghanistan and the US with tips and a poem by regular contributor Jeanne Probst. The team: Ariadne Sawyer, MA, Host and producer, Victor Schwartzman super tech and special volunteer Sharon Rowe completed the team.

LISTEN TO THIS GREAT SHOW RIGHT NOW!

 

 

 

 

 

Peter Nelson
Born in Lansing, Michigan, Peter Nelson discovered the trombone at age 10. Earning a bachelors degree in Jazz Studies at Michigan State University allowed him to study and perform with some of today’s top jazz artists, including Rodney Whitaker, Etienne Charles, Diego Rivera, Michael Dease and Vincent Chandler. After spending a year after college producing and recording his second album as a leader, Nelson moved to Brooklyn, NY where he currently performs, composes, and teaches in a number of settings. Nelson has been a finalist in every major North American jazz trombone competition and in 2012 was awarded the prestigious Sudler prize in the Arts. He leads multiple groups and is also a sought after section player, having performed with jazz orchestras backing the likes of John Hendricks, McCoy Tyner, Benny Golson, Jamie Cullum and Terence Blanchard. As a composer, Nelson has amassed a body of work that includes everything from jazz ensemble to contemporary pop. His versatility as a performer has led to a wide variety of performances and recordings with artists such as Christian McBride, Verve Pipe, Orrin Evans’ Captain Black Big Band, Jamie Cullum, The Hudson Horns, Marianne Solivan, the Dan Pugach Nonet, Matt Wilson, Grupo Ayé, The George Gee Swing Orchestra, Fleur Seule, Valerie Ponomarev, Michael Dease Big Band, and a score of others.
Peter Nelson

“This is an exciting and unusual contemporary jazz album, one with many layers of meaning, and definitely one you should discover.” –Marc Phillips, The Vinyl Anachronist.

Through vivid compositions and enthralling playing the album retraces Nelson’s five-year struggle with a debilitating condition that threatened to end his career as a musician just as it was entering its ascendancy.

Nelson enlisted three different ensembles to tell this story: an ethereal trio featuring vibraphonist Nikara Warren and the wordless vocals of Alexa Barchini; a hard-swinging quartet with pianist Willerm Delisfort, bassist Raviv Markovitz, and drummer Itay Morchi; and a brilliant septet supplementing the quartet with alto saxophonist Hailey Niswanger, trumpeter Josh Lawrence, and bass clarinetist Yuma Uesaka.

Trombonist/Composer Peter Nelson Triumphs Over His Five-Year Struggle with Mysterious Chronic Pain on Stunning New Album Ash, Dust, and the Chalkboard Cinema, out August 31 on Outside In Music, features three ensembles taking listeners on a narrative journey through suffering, discovery and healing.

A native of Lansing, Michigan, Nelson earned his degree in Jazz Studies at Michigan State University, where he studied with heavy hitters like bassist Rodney Whitaker. After recording two albums in his home state he decided to move to Brooklyn in 2013, and soon found himself performing with longtime heroes like pianist/bandleader Orrin Evans and drummer Matt Wilson. Almost simultaneously, however, he started to develop strange symptoms while playing.
At first the issues were minor: small, localized pain and subtle feelings of anxiety. Before long, the symptoms escalated to include chronic hyperventilation, severe shortness of breath, and excruciating pain in the face down his back and arms. “Here I was playing with a lot of my heroes, in musical settings that I’d dreamed about and I spent a lot of time trying to cultivate,” Nelson recalls. “And it became very difficult to be on the bandstand while at the same time fighting my horn and fighting my body. It felt like a physically violent way of losing my medium for relating to the world, and was emotionally and spiritually crippling.”
Nelson sought the help of innumerable doctors, physiologists and educators, failing to find satisfactory answers from any source. After more than a year and a half of intense pain and frustrating questions, Nelson found his way to physiologist and trombonist Jan Kagarice, one of the world’s leading authorities on musicians’ health. Kagarice diagnosed him with focal dystonia, chronic hyperventilation and Chvostek sign, and in a single lesson reversed 60% of his pain, immediately allowing him to play again.
His symptoms, it turned out, were the result not of some curious illness but of bad pedagogy – bad habits inherited from teachers working from a misunderstanding of the human body and the physical process of making music. “The stereotype is that brass players have chops problems and difficulty with endurance,” he explains. “But the entirety of brass pedagogy is not only physiologically destructive but physics-wise has very little to do with how sound is actually made.”
Five years after the onset of his symptoms, Nelson is fully recovered and playing as beautifully as ever, pain-free. Writing the ten compositions on this album meant excavating a number of difficult feelings, but the trombonist was intent on engaging fully and honestly with the full spectrum of his ordeal. He brings his experiences vividly to life with the help of his gifted collaborators, each of whom have played an important part in his life in one context or another, from the bandstand to the classroom.
Nelson is hesitant to reveal the meaning behind his somewhat cryptic album title, but a few themes emerge: Ash and Dust make obvious references to things crumbling away and left behind, referring perhaps to the composer’s symptoms or incorrect approaches. The Chalkboard Cinema, meanwhile, suggests the somewhat illusory nature of education, jazz education in particular – lessons taught as gospel but more akin to the flickering images of the silver screen.
Ash, Dust, and the Chalkboard Cinema traces each step along Nelson’s road to recovery, from the creeping onset in “It Starts Slowly (First in Your Heart)” to the confounding spiral of “Cyclical Maze (Round and Round We Go)” through the zen-like mantra “Do Nothing (If Less Is More),” a tribute to Kagarice and her life-altering teachings. “Behind Kind Eyes (Thank You)” is a meditation on the loss of a loved one, a nod to the tragedies that can occur around us while we’re struggling through our own, while “Closure is a Wasted Prayer (Release, Relax)” ends with the ambiguous acknowledgment that expecting any chapter of life to neatly draw to a conclusion.

With the evocatively titled Ash, Dust, and the Chalkboard Cinema, trombonist/composer Peter Nelson retraces his five-year struggle with a debilitating condition that threatened to end his career as a musician just as it was entering its ascendancy. The album’s vivid compositions and enthralling playing draw the listener in to experience the grueling emotional journey that Nelson undertook, from the onset of mysterious symptoms through the isolating battle with physical and mental pain through the rigor of healing and the joy and revelation of recovery.clusion is a fool’s errand.

“We always want closure,” Nelson says, “but it’s an almost laughable concept. I’m always going to be dealing with dystonia, but it’s not something that controls my life. The idea of putting a cap on this whole process does a disservice to the process of excavating these feelings and dealing with them. Everything that I learned about brass playing — and more importantly about myself and what music-making really means to me –those lessons are priceless and I wouldn’t change a thing.”

“Peter Nelson is an exciting and creative trombonist making waves on the NYC jazz scene. If his name is on it, you know you are getting something good! With the music world brimming with talent more than ever, Peter’s one to keep an eye on.” – Michael Dease, award-winning trombonist and educator

“Nelson has a sweet, stutter shuttled virtuosity on his valveless instrument of mystical musical astronomers, floating on deep rhythmic currents.” – Kitty Montgomery, Chamber Music America

Due out August 31 via Outside In Music, Ash, Dust, and the Chalkboard Cinema enlisted three different ensembles to tell its compelling story, all featuring Nelson on trombone: an ethereal trio featuring vibraphonist Nikara Warren and the wordless vocals of Alexa Barchini; a hard-swinging quartet with pianist Willerm Delisfort, bassist Raviv Markovitz, and drummer Itay Morchi; and a brilliant septet supplementing the quartet with alto saxophonist Hailey Niswanger, trumpeter Josh Lawrence, and bass clarinetist Yuma Uesaka.

© Greg Jones

 Source and Copyright © 2018 Braithwaite & Katz, All rights reserved.

 

World Poetry Celebrates Minal Sarosh from India!

Ariadne’s Notes:

The World Poetry Café Radio Show, on June 8, 2017 welcomed E-Poet Minal Sarosh ! Her poem was read on the show and nicely received. We have an active E-poet spot on the show, featuring poets from all over the world. Featured poets and musician Lozan Yolmosky  and Serwan Yolmosky also read poetry in English, Arabic and Kurdish as well as music with the oud.

LISTEN TO THE SHOW !

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minal Sarosh is an Indian English poet and novelist. Her first poetry book ‘Mitosis and Other Poems’, was published by Writers Workshop (1992), Kolkata.  And her first novel  ‘Soil for My Roots’ was published by LiFi Publications, New Delhi, 2015.

She has won awards for poetry — (a) All India Poetry Competition 2005 of The Poetry Society (India) Delhi. – Commendation Prize. (b)Creative Writing Competition 2006 of Unisun Publications, Bangalore-Third Prize (c) SMS Poetry Competition 2007 and 2008 Kala Ghoda Arts Festival, Mumbai-Third Prize (d) Unisun Reliance TimeOut Book Club Awards 2008-09-Special Mention

Her poetry has been published in anthologies — The Journal of the Poetry Society (India), Chandrabhaga, (Edited by Jayanta Mahapatra), Indian Literature (published by Sahitya Akademi , Delhi), Emerging Voices ( The Poetry Society India, Delhi), Poetry India: Voices of Hope ( The Poetry Society India,

 

Fingers at Work

 

Under the weight of balloons

even strings tie me down.

Fingers let go!

my thoughts are air,

the sky is the limit for them.

 

Under the blanket of night

even the darkness blinds me.

Fingers stoke the cinders!

My thoughts are fire,

leaping out from the sun.

 

Under the wafting boat,

even the waves could overturn me.

Fingers row harder!

My thoughts are water,

and oceans have racing horizons.

 

And under the lawnmower

I could be trimmed like grass.

Fingers grow roots!

My thoughts are soil,

and the whole earth is my garden.

 

But, oh fingers do what you want,

but do it fast!

My life is just a soap bubble,

weighing less than a feather,

it will glide for a short while,

       and then might burst, anytime.

 

(First published in ‘The Journal of the Poetry Society (India)’ Delhi. Vol 22, 2011. Edited by Sharmila Ray)

Minal  Sarosh (C) All rights reserved by the author.